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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Jeffrey Richter
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Great book but the tiltle is misleading


There's a real danger with new technologies that books about them will be shallow, simply because nobody's had time to really use them much or find out things in depth. Richter gets around that by virtue of writing for Microsoft Press, and having inside access to the .NET development team. This means that he's able to explain not only how things are in great detail, but also why they're that way. Richter displays a fine command of relevant detail; any aspiring .NET programmer will be far more grounded in the fundamentals of the .NET Framework after reading this book.
In fact, I'd go so far as to say that this book (or one very much like it) is essential reading for any real .NET programmer. You can do cargo-cult programming without understanding things at a real level, but if you want to do real programming, you need to know what's really going on. If you read this book, you'll know. The quality of information presented is excellent here -- this book is good enough that it could be published by O'Reilly, which is the highest compliment I can pay a tech book.
So, what about objectivity? This was my biggest potential worry going into the book. After all, it is a Microsoft Press book, and the author does seem to know the .NET development team, so there's definitely a potential lack of objectivity there. More, it seems like most of the books out there that cover .NET technologies do so with a complete blindness to all non-Microsoft technologies, which is patently ridiculous -- .NET owes so much to Java that it's inconceivable it'd exist as it currently exists without Java's example to look to, but authors write about .NET as the natural evolution of COM without any reference to its non-Microsoft predecessors. The creeping suspicion one gets is that the author isn't actually familiar with any non-Microsoft technologies, which makes you wonder just how much they really know.
Richter doesn't make you wonder. Somewhat frustratingly, he doesn't talk much about Java, but he does reference other technologies, and (most importantly) isn't afraid to point out shortcomings of .NET, even going so far as to highlist some aspects as egregious bugs or just poor design. There's no suspicion that Richter is in Microsoft's pocket, or that this book has been sanitized for PR purposes.
In fact, the only real fault I can find in this book is that it does neglect Java. The most irritating effect of this neglect is that the book is clearly written for an audience of Windows C++/COM programmers coming to .NET, not for Java programmers looking to .NET. In large part, this isn't a big deal, but it does lead to unnecessarily long and introductory chapters on strings, exceptions, and garbage handling (I wondered at first why Richter spent so much time on these topics, which are very familiar to Java programmers, before remembering that C++ programmers wouldn't be nearly as familiar with them).
Still, that's not a big deal, and it probably had to be written that way, as there's a huge audience of C++ programmers out there, and they need to know this stuff. It leads to a few skimmable chapters for the Java programmer, but the rest of the book more than makes up for it; and even the Java-similar chapters contain enough .NET-specific stuff that Java programmers could stand to learn a bit from them.
If you're a real programmer (say, someone who knows what polymorphism is, which excludes most VB monkeys) and are, or expect to be, programming with the .NET Framework, buy this book and read it.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Learning Perl, Third Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Randal L. Schwartz, Tom Phoenix
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Great book for beginning programming on a *NIX platform.


If you haven't done much programming on a *NIX box, then this book is for you. If you have, but just need an intro to Perl, it's still pretty good, but very light reading - you might as well buy a copy of Programming Perl at the same time, so you can just shift over when you're done. Especially good if you have no programming experience whatsoever, but don't fault the book for not teaching you *NIX - it's not meant to do that.



Product: Book - Textbook Binding
Title: Routing TCP/IP Volume I (CCIE Professional Development)
Publisher: Cisco Press
Authors: Jeff Doyle
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Not Just For CCIE Candidates


Having just successfully written the CCIE Written exam today, I can honestly say that I probably wouldn't have without this book, and I have an excellent foundation for the lab work ahead.
I won't repeat what others have said, but I would strongly recommend this book for those working on their CCNP as well, particularly for ACRC. This book would have helped illuminate a great number of topics from that tough course. Very impressive work and I am sure I will be wearing out the spine in the years ahead. Thanks, Jeff!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: ASP in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: A. Keyton Weissinger
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Treeview


My Question is Creating Treeview in ASP by using Java Script. I Hope You Will Help me With Solution Soon. It Looks Like Windows Explorer. Thank You raghu