Sponsored links


Valid XHTML 1.0!
Valid CSS!
Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Second Edition
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Walter Oney
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Essential for your WDM Library


Having read this book half way, I believe it is intended for experienced developers instead of for beginners in device programming. Rather than offering a structural and formal introduction to the subject, it stresses on tricks and hints on selected topics like synchronization, pnp, read/write, etc.
I now go for the DDK documentation for a more fundamental treatment. It cleared up instantly some of the questions built up as I read through the first five chapters of the book, like how a user mode application calls up the kernal mode driver. Nevertheless the author does give an authoritative insight in WDM programming. Incidentally, it is a matter of taste whether you like his informal writing style.
As a beginner at the moment, I rated this book three stars. I might rate it differently when I returned to the book later.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: The Data Warehouse Lifecycle Toolkit : Expert Methods for Designing, Developing, and Deploying Data Warehouses
Publisher: Wiley
Authors: Ralph Kimball, Laura Reeves, Margy Ross, Warren Thornthwaite
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Good book, but could've been better


Not enough examples....they keep referring to other books. The book would've been awesome if it had more examples (specially designing star schema models and aggregations). I don't like to spend $40-50 each on two books just to get the examples and lot of the repeat information. The book companies and the authors are making more money by doing this, but they're not winning fans (Wiley books and Kimball)



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Sams Teach Yourself Perl in 21 Days (2nd Edition)
Publisher: Sams
Authors: Laura Lemay, Richard Colburn, Robert Kiesling
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A good book to read


This a good book to read if you want to study PERL Language. It's clear step by step explanation just fits right for beginners like me! And not only does it covers the basic, it also covers more advanced techniques. I think everyone can use this book both as a beginner's guide and a nutshell reference. Even my experienced colleagues still refer to this book whenever they find troubles in PERL programming. I recommend this book to those who want to get their hands on PERL. It might be a little bit too thick, but worth the money and time you spend to buy and read it..



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Debugging Applications for Microsoft .NET and Microsoft Windows
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: John Robbins
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A very useful discussion of Windows debugging practices


This book brings a vast amount of Windows-specific debugging information together in one place and has been very helpful to me. Some of this info could be found elsewhere, but only by sorting through dozens of documentation pages and magazine articles, some many years old, and additionally the author adds value by giving very explicit instructions (even providing source code) on how to do things that are often only hinted at in the Microsoft documentation.

Most useful to me were the symbol-server tips, the SuperAssert macro and seeing how it does it what it does, crash handling in general, and the author's insight into why certain things are so slow (like OutputDebugString).

This book does have a not-so-subtle anti-C++ bias, there are little digs at C++ coding techniques throughout the book, which seem a little antiquated and inappropriate in 2005.

In the chapter on the debug C-runtime, I'm really surprised the author does not suggest writing a leak-detection system that captures the callstack at the time of allocation, I've found the C-runtime's file-and-line-oriented leak report fairly useless since the allocation is often deep inside some container class, you really need to know what code caused the allocation, not what code actually did the allocation. And the recommended feature that walks the entire heap every N allocations is unusable (it's too slow) in a large C++ program which might have many thousands of allocations. Also, redefining C++ keywords as suggested seems so evil, there are better ways of doing this.

I believe Windows XP Service Pack 2 changed some Windows internals that affect crash handling/debugging/stack walking, I wouldn't mind seeing an updated volume that covers these changes in detail.

Overall though, an excellent book, the most useful debugging book I've found so far.